Forbes, "Fixing Business's Gender Inequality At The Root"

In just the last few years, the conversation surrounding women’s equality has been wide-ranging, ever-evolving, and contentious; from #MeToo, to the reflexive and often violent backlash, it seems that the cultural reevaluation of how women fit into society is deservedly at the center of the public discourse. At the core of it has been the growing awareness of how women are systematically held back. These problems affect women in every field; women are not recruited or promoted in anywhere near the numbers of their male counterparts, creating a feedback loop of self-perpetuating bias. Which is what makes the news coming out of Goldman Sachs so exciting: a policy change aimed at fundamentally reinventing hiring culture at one of the biggest financial firms in the world.

CONTINUE READING

Read More
Ericho
Forbes, "How Goldman Sachs Is Making A Revolutionary Pitch For Workplace Equality"

In just the last few years, the conversation surrounding women’s equality has been wide-ranging, ever-evolving, and contentious; from #MeToo, to the reflexive and often violent backlash, it seems that the cultural reevaluation of how women fit into society is deservedly at the center of the public discourse. At the core of it has been the growing awareness of how women are systematically held back. These problems affect women in every field; women are not recruited or promoted in anywhere near the numbers of their male counterparts, creating a feedback loop of self-perpetuating bias. Which is what makes the news coming out of Goldman Sachs so exciting: a policy change aimed at fundamentally reinventing hiring culture at one of the biggest financial firms in the world.

CONTINUE READING

Read More
Ericho
Forbes, "Why Closing The Gender Pay Gap Just Hit A Judicial Speed Bump"

Last year, there was what appeared to be a significant development in workplace pay equality for men and women. The Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals ruled, in the case of Rizo v. Yovino, that companies would not be allowed to use an employee’s salary history to determine future earnings, effectively shuttering one of the most significant factors in perpetuating the gender gap.

However, there have been ongoing developments in the case. I sat down with Sherry Culves of Nelson Mullins Riley and Scarborough, an expert on pay inequality issues, to discuss these developments and how they’ll play into the ongoing problem.

CONTINUE READING

Read More
Ericho
Elizabeth Elting Foundation and American Heart Association Celebrate with Annual Benefit for Women's Heart Health

Liz Elting, Founder and CEO of the Elizabeth Elting Foundation and noted advocate for women's equality, education, and health, is partnering with the American Heart Association as Campaign Co-Chair and Sponsor at the 2019 New York City Go Red For Women® Luncheon. Coinciding with International Women's Day, this year's event will be held on Friday, March 8. "This is my sixth year working with the American Heart Association's Go Red for Women campaign, and I'm grateful to continue to have the opportunity to support such important work," said Elting. “Heart disease is the number-one killer of women in the U.S., and yet many still aren't aware of their risk factors and the basic warning signs of heart disease unique to women. The more we spread this knowledge, the more lives we'll save.”

CONTINUE READING

Read More
Ericho
Forbes, "Tech Is Still A Man's World -- But We Can Fix It"

It’s no secret that men dominate the business world. From the boardroom to the mailroom, men are vastly overrepresented at every level, which is really the opposite of surprising; we all know the cliché about it being a “man’s world,” but that truism communicates reality to an extent that I think we’re often unwilling to recognize: gender equality in the workplace is still very far from a reality, save in the fevered imaginations of clusters of internet “men’s rights advocacy” groups who think women have mysteriously and surreptitiously conquered the world.

CONTINUE READING

Read More
Ericho
Forbes, "The Slow Movement of Progress – Why Can't We Do Better?"

An ongoing fascination of mine is the subject of how #MeToo, now in its second year, has been (or hasn’t been) transforming the public landscape that women have to navigate. For the most part, despite the public takedowns of some of the most prominent men in media, the on-the-ground situation for women in most sectors hasn’t really changed; by and large, companies aren’t adopting the kinds of policy changes needed to create real systems of accountability, and paranoia over imaginary “false accusations” is making some men more (misguidedly) apprehensive to even interact with their female employees or coworkers at all.

CONTINUE READING

Read More
Ericho
Forbes, "How Nevada Is Leading The Way On Curbing Harassment & Abuse In The Workplace"

One of the most interesting aspects of the #MeToo movement has been the ways it has – though more often hasn’t – translated into policy decisions. It’s been a very mixed bag in that regard, with people at most companies reporting that #MeToo has not resulted in concrete policy initiatives, and at those where it has, a mere decline in reports is the only metric of success. This is faulty for a lot of reasons, but it remains an ongoing problem: companies aren’t taking the initiative.

CONTINUE READING

Read More
Ericho
Elizabeth Elting Foundation and Trinity College Celebrate 50 Years of Co-education

Liz Elting, Founder and CEO of the Elizabeth Elting Foundation, will be hosting a celebratory evening with Trinity College in honor of the 50th anniversary of the school becoming a co-educational institution. In 1969, the preeminent New England liberal arts college admitted its first women students. Since then, the women of Trinity have gone on to break boundaries, forge successful careers, and flourish into global leaders.  

CONTINUE READING

Read More
Ericho
Forbes, "Quotas And The Lie Of Meritocracy"

Last July, I wrote a piece here at Forbes about how the underrepresentation of women in corporate boards is a big problem, a clear indication of both how women are systematically excluded from leadership positions and the end result of that process. The shutting-out of women from leadership is a problem built into the system; men are simply more likely to promote men. Which means that, all things being equal, a predominantly male leadership regime will tend to remain so. Even companies with a self-conscious commitment to gender equality still repeat the same old patterns. Inertia, simply put, is hard to overcome without a push from a stronger force. That’s basic physics.

CONTINUE READING

Read More
Ericho
Forbes, "4 Ways Women Mentoring Women Can Change The World"

If there’s one theme to my writing here at Forbes, it’s the necessity of women to band together if we want to achieve equality in the workplace and beyond. The shameful display on Capitol Hill last month, as Brett Kavanaugh was rushed to confirmation despite Christine Blasey Ford’s credible accusations against him, only further underlines the fact that, all things being equal, men act to benefit themselves; as a rule, men benefit from the current power structures in place, and with no incentive to help dismantle them, will continue to prop them up and act in ways that benefit themselves. It’d be tragic if it weren’t commonplace, but it underscores a critical truth: if they won’t help us, we have to help ourselves. That fact applies to another topic I’m passionate about as well: mentorship.

CONTINUE READING

Read More
Ericho
Forbes, "Why Pregnancy Discrimination Still Matters"

Let’s talk about biology.

As evidenced by last year’s infamous Google memo, there somehow still exist those who’ll defend sex and gender-based discrimination with claims of supposedly innate differences (like men being more logical, for instance) that make men more suited for a variety of jobs: “it’s simple biology,” they profess.

CONTINUE READING

Read More
Ericho
Forbes, "The Banality Of Sexual Abuse, The WeWork Scandal, And What Companies Need To Learn From It"

If there are any fruits from the past year of #MeToo, the biggest is probably that women have been emboldened to talk about their experiences and fight back, something we are so often trained not to do from an early age. That’s what makes the whole movement so extraordinary; despite its hashtagged moniker, is that it’s taken a conversation that’s long been a part of social media and thrust it into the real world, bringing about real-life consequences for those involved.

CONTINUE READING

Read More
Ericho
Forbes, "A Hard Look At The Hard Numbers of #MeToo"

When I was working on this article, I was listening to the testimony of Dr. Christine Blasey Ford regarding her allegations of sexual assault at the hands of Brett Kavanaugh, then still a nominee for the seat on the United States Supreme Court. It was a heartbreaking thing to witness, even from a distance, making crystal clear the reality in which women exist; the victim requested full-scale investigations and was met with only the most grudging support, and beyond the hearing itself, authorities worked hard to suppress the testimony and discredit the source in advance.

CONTINUE READING

Read More
Ericho
Elizabeth Elting Foundation, American Heart Association, and Same Sky Partner for Shop With Your Heart Benefit

Liz Elting, Founder and CEO of the Elizabeth Elting Foundation and noted advocate for women's equality and health, is partnering with the American Heart Association and the Same Sky Foundation for a charity fundraiser to support both Same Sky's global work empowering underserved women through entrepreneurship as well as the AHA's Go Red For Women campaign promoting awareness of issues affecting women's cardiac health.

CONTINUE READING

Read More
Ericho
Forbes, "What To Do When Your Abuser Isn't A Media Figure"

Last weekend, #MeToo struck its biggest blow since Harvey Weinstein. Les Moonves – the architect of the CBS media empire and one of the most powerful men in the entertainment business period, overseeing the acquisition of media outlets across the world – was brought down amidst a flurry of assault and harassment accusations, forced to exit the conglomerate he ruled for over twenty years. It’s perhaps the highest-profile fall from grace since #MeToo came to the forefront last year, and in its wake, it finally seems as if no one is too powerful to continue dodging the consequences of their actions. After all, who, if not Les Moonves, could possibly be safe?

CONTINUE READING

Read More
Ericho
Forbes, "How The Next Generation Of Women Lawmakers Can Change America"

In this crazy, politically volatile year, there’s been plenty to worry about. But amongst all the trouble, there’s a sign of hope: more women have won major party nominations in 2018 than ever before. The year and a half since Trump’s nomination has been one of growing political awareness and activity for women, starting with the massive Women’s March and threading all the way to #MeToo. More and more, the Trump era has been one of angry women realizing they have a voice, and stepping up to use it.

CONTINUE READING

Read More
Ericho
Forbes, "What Can You Do About Workplace Sexual Abuse When The HR Director Is The Abuser?"

On July 31, the news broke that FEMA’s HR chief, a man named Corey Coleman, had been engaging in sustained sexual harassment of female staffers for years, including allegedly hiring female employees specifically to serve as sexual partners for male colleagues. It’s a shocking story, but only in scale; this kind of culture of exploitation is not new in the American workplace, as almost any woman professional can attest. And while it’s usually not so blatant, there are still workplaces where the people responsible for keeping employees safe are the ones perpetuating the abuse.

CONTINUE READING

Read More
Ericho
Forbes, "How to Navigate a Boys' Club Culture"

I’ve been writing for some time about the unique barriers women face when pursuing their careers. Corporate culture is often less accessible to women for very clear historical reasons: the modern workplace was built around the assumption of a nuclear family with a working father and a stay-at-home mom, and for as much as our society has changed, that model is still assumed in workplaces across America. The result is a culture that excludes all but a specific type of employee and isn’t actually good for anyone (in which the only way to excel is to work all hours because the employee presumably has a wife at home keeping the fire lit and the kids fed).

CONTINUE READING

Read More
Ericho