In the News

Liz Elting has been profiled in several books, including The New York Times bestseller “Succeed by Your Own Terms” (McGraw-Hill), “Leadership Secrets of the World’s Most Successful CEOs” (Dearborn Trade Publishing), and “Straight Talk About Starting and Growing Your Business” (McGraw-Hill). She is also featured regularly in the media, including The New York TimesThe Wall Street Journal, Forbes, O (The Oprah Magazine), Entrepreneur, Business Insider, The Financial Times, Reader’s DigestHuffington Post, and Crain’s New York Business.


Go Red For Women Led By Two New York City

The American Heart Association announced today that Liz Elting, co-founder/CEO and Jessica Eker, Senior Vice President of TransPerfect, the world’s largest privately held provider of language and technology solutions for global business, will be co-chairs of the year-round Go Red For Women movement in New York City. As co-chairs of the Go Red For Women movement in New York City, Ms. Elting and Eker will champion the issue of women and heart disease and will work to elevate the Go Red For Women mission within the community. “It’s an honor to contribute to the mission of the American Heart Association through their Go Red For Women movement,” said Ms. Elting.

Forbes, "Millennials & The Opportunity of Intrapreneurship"

Millennials are the future of American business, but not in the way you might think. Let me be absolutely frank about this. I don’t just mean that, demographically, they’ll eventually age into it, although that’s true. I mean that millennials have the drive, skill and hunger to push themselves to succeed in truly massive ways that could drive our entire business economy in unexpected directions. The companies that succeed are the companies that embrace an intrapreneurship model that takes advantage of all the considerable assets millennials bring to the table. Give them the means and watch them change the world.

Forbes, "Why (Exactly) Companies Need To Create Women-Friendly Workplaces"

Let’s start with a basic fact: being a woman in the workplace isn’t easy. That is an understatement. The march of women from the home to the workplace, which goes all the way back to early industrialization before becoming a central issue for middle-class feminism in the sixties and seventies, is fraught precisely because it represents a collision of deeply ingrained social expectation: the public sphere belongs to men, the private sphere to women. The entire discussion of “women in the workplace” should be treated as ridiculous on its face because it assumes that our presence is somehow new or remarkable, as if we haven’t been working for the entirety of human history.

 

Forbes, "The Crisis Of Integrity In Public Life"

Fostering cultures of integrity means putting structures in place to ensure that not only are cheating, corruption, and bullying discouraged, but that no employee, regardless of position, is ever afraid to speak up and take action. It’s smart business too, by the way. Ethics can be a competitive advantage, serving as a strong differentiator in a crowded marketplace, as well as helping to attract top talent. We owe it to our companies, our employees, our customers and ultimately to ourselves to help ensure that we do not protect bullies from the consequences of their actions. It requires active effort. But it is not beyond us. There may be few things simpler.

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Underdog, "Liz Elting – Co-Founder & Co-CEO, TransPerfect"

With Elting’s commitment and vision, TransPerfect has been an eight-time recipient of the Inc. 5000 Award, a six-time honoree of the Deloitte Technology Fast 500, and has earned multiple Stevie Awards, including Company of the Year and Fastest Growing Tech Company of the Year in 2016. Crain’s New York Business has named TransPerfect one of the largest privately held companies and one of the largest women-owned companies for nine consecutive years. TransPerfect has also been named one of the fastest-growing women-owned/led businesses in North America by Entrepreneur and the Women Presidents’ Organization.

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Forbes, "America's Richest Self-Made Women of 2017"

Forbes’ third annual tally of America’s 60 most successful self-made women has a new number one, two new billionaires, a transgender woman who climbed back into the ranks after a one year absence and five newcomers. It’s a diverse group of entrepreneurs, executives and entertainers who made their fortunes in everything from makeup and music to fashion, food and finance and range in age from 27 to 90. All of them, who together are worth a record $61.5 billion, share a passion for their products and how they can help their customers.

 
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Forbes, "The High Cost Of Ambition: Why Women Are Held Back For Thinking Big"

The things men are praised for—assertive action, commitment to principle, lofty goals, refusal to compromise—are often the very things women are penalized for. This isn’t a secret, and it’s something women have to contend with constantly. A 2014 study of performance reviews found that women are not only more likely to receive negative reviews, but also more likely to be criticized for exhibiting behaviors that men were actively encouraged to cultivate: aggressiveness, assertiveness, and ambition. It’s a structural problem buried deep in our cultural consciousness.

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Forbes, "Don't Ask For Permission - Forging New Paths And Going Your Own"

One of the most significant moments in my career is one that my younger self felt scared and even embarrassed by – I quit. More specifically, I left my first post-M.B.A. job in finance (in equity at a French bank) after only two weeks. While two weeks is admittedly an incredibly short amount of time to make such a drastic move, it was long enough for me to understand what my expected role was, and it wasn’t at all the position I signed on for. The tension of working in an office where my gender meant being expected to answer phones, make coffee and fulfill administrative tasks not remotely in the realm of my job description was a discredit and disservice to my education, work experience and abilities.

Forbes 2016 Self-Made Women issue

Liz Elting (right) featured among eight other pioneering women entrepeneurs on the cover of Forbes 2016 Self-Made Women issue. "We couldn't decide on just one cover star for Forbes' second annual Richest Self-Made Women issue, so we went with nine. For the first cover shoot of its kind, Forbes gathered nine of the most successful women entrepreneurs in the country, ranging in age from 32 to 69. They include a Silicon Valley CEO, a supermodel-turned-mogul, and a billionaire inventor. Between them, there are as many Harvard MBAs as there are community college dropouts. Combined, these nine women are worth $9.7 billion."

 
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Makers, "This Self-Made Female Billionaire Never Let Men Define Her Career"

Liz Elting never quit anything in her life except for the "perfect" job she landed at 26. The linguaphile had previously worked in five countries, and studied four languages before graduating from NYU with an MBA. The then recent graduate, eager to build a career, took a job in international corporate finance. She was the only woman in the office. And, so began the "unnerving reality," Elting describes. Instead of doing her job, she was subjected to "Liz — phone!" every time the phone rang or asked to take messages for her colleagues. That's when she had a defining moment. She believed she was meant to lead — and she was right.

Forbes, "How This Woman Went From Fetching Coffee To CEO Of A $1 Billion Company"

Liz Elting is a self-made woman whose success landed her on the FORBES’ list of America’s Richest Self-Made Women. She’s the cofounder and CEO of TransPerfect, one of the world's largest translation firms. She’s also a linguaphile—by the time she was 25, Elting lived and worked in five countries (Portugal, Spain, Canada, Venezuela and the U.S.) and studied four languages. At 26, armed with her MBA from New York University, she took that “perfect” job that didn’t turn out to be so perfect. But that’s when the romantic entrepreneurial story begins.

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Liz Elting Featured on CFW Careers Changing the Conversation Panel

Liz was honored to speak at the 2016 CFW Careers' Changing the Conversation: Empowering Women in Business event series, a semi-annual panel featuring exemplary women who have forged their way to the top of their respective industries, breaking barriers along the way. The series, hosted by eMarketer, provides a forum for women in business to learn from female peers across all organizational levels and openly discuss the challenges women face in the workplace.

 
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Liz Elting Appointed To Trinity College Board Of Trustees

Liz Elting was named by Trinity College to its Board of Trustees. Elting, who received her B.A. in Modern Languages and Literatures from Trinity in 1987, joins four other appointees as the newest members of the Board. Trinity College President Joanne Berger-Sweeney announced the five new Trustees last week. In addition to her new position on Trinity's Board, Elting serves on Trinity Women's Leadership Council's Founders Council and was awarded the College's Medal for Excellence in 2007.

NOW-NYC Honors Liz at Its 2016 Women of Power & Influence Awards

Receiving a 2016 Women of Power & Influence Award, Liz was honored by the National Organization of Women at its annual gala, which recognizes exemplary women who have boldly forged their way to the top of their industries, breaking barriers along the way, and earning the title of pioneer and role model. Each year, NOW gathers to celebrate extraordinary women working in business, finance, entrepreneurship, technology, law, and government.

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Entrepreneur, "Why 'Don't Take It Personally' Is BS

If you are an entrepreneur who has launched a startup, you know the feeling of pouring your heart and soul into a business. At some point along the way, it’s possible that you’ve also been told that you shouldn’t take your business matters personally – after all, “it’s just business.” Easier said than done. Often, founders have a difficult time finding a balance between focusing on the x's and o's of building a business while still letting their passion and emotional investment guide them.

 
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The Wall Street Journal, "CEO Moms Should Set an Example"

Being a CEO doesn’t mean you can’t be a good mom. If you want to have a family and run a business, you can — and a growing number of us do. It’s certainly not without its challenges, but there are successful women who are making it work. When I had both my sons, I was working from home the weeks they were born. At that time, that kind of decision wasn’t always championed. But today, many female leaders are celebrated for it.

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Inc., "Still Growing, Still Independent, Still Happy"

Life After the Inc. 500: Elizabeth Elting has grown TransPerfect Translations by over 30 percent annually since 2000 without a dime of outside funds–and she plans to keep it that way. Elizabeth Elting sounds like a lot of CEOs when she proclaims that her translation company could one day be a billion-dollar business. Unlike the vast majority, her TransPerfect Translations may have a shot.

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The new York Times, "A Work Ethic Shaped at an Early Age"

I worked from an extremely young age — everything from babysitting to newspaper deliveries to walking a child to school to working in a dry cleaner to telemarketing. And now when we hire, that’s one of the key qualities I look for. I look for people who have a very strong work ethic, and I think a big indicator of that is whether somebody has worked from a very young age, and ideally has never stopped.